Physical Rehab- Program Protocol Intervention

  1. Research and write Intervention Protocols for the interventions listed below.

The expectation is that you research the intervention design for the physical rehabilitation population. Your protocol may have to identify/limit the program to specific populations based on your research. The research should be done using the NTL Learning Commons. Please make sure all research is from peer reviewed journals. List all references in APA format. You will then write the protocol based on the research. See attached outline and sample for the Intervention Protocol.

  1. Topic: Leisure Education

Create program plans/session plans/scripts, etc. Create these in such a way that a therapist can pick them up and run your program exactly as described.

ATTACHED IS A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF HOW THE FINAL PROTOCOL WILL LOOK WHEN COMPLETE.

MUST BE PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES, APA FORMAT, AND PROPER CITATIONS.

Intervention Protocol Outline

  • Intervention (Title)
  • General Statement of Purpose
  • List of expected Outcomes
  • Description of Program
  • Presenting client problems that may be addressed (symptoms)
  • Referral process (what is necessary for the client to be in the group, ie, physician order, etc.)
  • Contraindications/Precautions
  • Intervention Process
  • Staff Requirement (ratio, training, certification)
  • Space and Equipment Requirement
  • References (APA format)Interven’on Protocol Student Sample

    Interven’on Group: Animal-Assisted Therapy – Canines for Depression

    Purpose: To reduce symptoms of depression in clients with schizophrenia who reside in a mental health facility.

    Expected Outcomes: To improve client outcomes in physical, emo=onal, cogni=ve, social and spiritual domains.

    Physical: • lowers blood pressure • Increases range of mo=on • Increases tolerance for physical ac=vity with pain present • Improves hand-eye coordina=on • Improves posture • Improves siCng, standing or walking endurance • Increases strength in upper and lower extremi=es to improve performance of ac=vi=es of daily

    living • Decreases pain • Improves balance and mobility

    Cogni=ve: • Increases memory recall and concentra=on • Improves problem solving • Increases focus and aFen=on on task • Improves ability to follow direc=on

    Emo=onal: • Reduces anxiety • Eases the distress of loneliness • Increases par=cipa=on in ac=vi=es • Facilitates an emo=onal response • Increases op=mism • Increases self esteem

    Social: • Increases social interac=on • Improves communica=on skills • Improves willingness to be involved in group ac=vity when an animal is present • Improves mo=va=on to walk when an animal is present

    Descrip’on of Program: This is a program tailored to the individual’s needs. The session with a therapy dog should last about 45 minutes and the visita=on should occur once a week.

    Presen’ng Client Problems: Clients who would benefit from this program include those who:

    • suffer from feelings of loneliness • don’t want to interact with others

    • suffer from anxiety • have fond memories of animals

    Referral Criteria: The client should be referred to the program by their physician with the consent of the client and the client’s family (if required).

    Contradic’ons:

    • Client is afraid of an animal • Client is allergic to animals or pet dander • Client who is not interested in par=cipa=ng in the program • Client who has a history of animal abuse or is unable to treat an animal properly • Client has history of aggressive behavior • Client who has any open sores, etc. • Client whose cultural beliefs are not in alignment

    Interven’on Process: Each session will be structured according to the following: I. Implementa=on

    • Iden=fy and recruit only cer=fied animals through the organiza=ons Pet Partners and/or Therapy Dogs Interna=onal

    • The handlers must be able to demonstrate that their therapy dog can respond to verbal and hand signals, can walk calmly on a leash by the handler’s side, obey commands, and behave appropriately in a variety of seCngs

    • The therapy dog must be on a leash and under the control of the handler at all =mes

    • The therapy dog must be well groomed on the day of the visit • The recruited animals and handlers should visit the facility to meet the staff, tour

    the facility, and get a feel for the clients and the level of ac=vity at the facility • Iden=fy the objec=ves of the program and get an understanding how the therapy

    dog and handler would be most useful to the different clients

    II. Assessment

    • Assess the client to determine therapy goals prior to beginning AAT • Determine whether AAT is appropriate for the client • Get permission from the client and/or the client’s family • Iden=fy which ac=vi=es would be appropriate to reach the therapy goals • A schedule should be established for regular therapeu=c sessions

    III. Prac=ce

    • The AAT session must be supervised by the recrea=onal therapy staff • Provide and use hand sani=zer before and aVer each session • At the beginning of the AAT session, the therapy dog should be introduced to the

    client • The client must be given an overview of what will take place at that par=cular

    session • There will be general discussion about the therapy dog • Some of the ac=vi=es involved will include peCng it, holding it, walking with it,

    giving commands to do tricks, talking to it, giving treats to it, playing fetch and any another ac=vi=es deemed to be appropriate to client’s treatment goals.

    IV Review and Documenta=on

    • At the end of each session, the outcomes should be discussed with the therapist and recorded in the client’s chart.

    Staff Requirement: First and foremost, the animal to be used in the interven=on must be either a cer=fied Pet Partner or tested and cer=fied by Therapy Dogs Interna=onal. In addi=on, the handler should also be trained in animal-assisted therapy. The handler and the animal are part of a team. In addi=on, the therapy dog must be current with all its shots (i.e. rabies) and licenses. A recrea=onal therapist must also be present and direct the interven=on.

    Space and Equipment Requirement: Space large enough for the clients to ambulate. Items needed for the dog are collar, leash, grooming supplies, dog treats and water supplies and crate. Toys and other materials specific to the goal of the therapy session, i.e., balls of various sizes.

    Risk Management: All animals must be cer=fied by Pet Partner or by Therapy Dogs Interna=onal. The client should wear appropriate footwear and clothing. The client should never be leV alone with the therapy dog. The therapy dog must be cleaned and groomed, with nails cut within 24 hours of the visit. If, at any =me, the therapy dog shows signs of stress or aggression, the dog must be removed from the situa=on.

    Bibliography

    Berget, B., Ekeberg, O., Pedersen, I. & Braastad, B.O. (2011). Animal-assisted therapy with

    farm animals for persons with psychiatric disorders: Effects on anxiety and depression, a

    randomized controlled trial. Occupa=onal Therapy in Mental Health; 27:1, 50-64

    Jasperson, R.A. (2010). Animal-assisted therapy with female inmates with mental illness: A

    case example from a pilot program. Journal of Offender Rehabilita=on; 49: 417-433

    MoreC, F., DeRonchi, D., Bernabei, V., MarcheC, L., Ferrari, B., Forlani, C., NegreC, F.,

    SaccheC, C. & AC, A.R. (2011). Pet therapy in elderly pa=ents with mental illness.

    Psychogeriatrics; 11: 125-129

    Animal-Assisted Therapy Program Plan Sample

    Week 1: 1. Introduce yourself and the dog to the pa=ents a) Tell the pa=ents the dog’s name and age b) Tell the pa=ents the dog’s breed and talk about the breed c) Tell the pa=ents what the dog enjoys and likes to do d) Tell the pa=ents any funny stories about the dog

    2. Instruct the pa=ents how to properly approach the dog a) Tell the pa=ents to slowly walk over to the front of the dog while holding their hand out first

    for the dog to sniff b) Allow the dog to sniff the pa=ents’ hand c) Instruct the pa=ents to pet the dog gently

    3. Start a discussion with the pa=ents about their own personal experiences with dogs a) Ask each pa=ent if they ever owned a dog b) Ask each pa=ent to recall a pleasant memory they had with a dog c) Ask each pa=ent to discuss what they know about dogs

    4. Wrap up the discussion and ask the pa=ents for feedback a) Ask the pa=ents what they learned today b) Ask the pa=ents what they would like to do with the dog in the future c) Ask the pa=ents if they enjoyed today’s group d) Ask the pa=ents if they have any ques=ons or concerns e) Allow the pa=ents to say goodbye to the dog

    Week 2: 1. Reintroduce yourself and the dog and today’s ac=vity a) Inform the pa=ents that they will learn how to give a dog an obedience command b) Inform the pa=ents about the commands they will be learning today: sit, stay, lay down, give their paw, speak, and roll over c) Explain to the pa=ents the importance of the tone of voice they should use when giving a command d) Demonstrate the tone of voice and an example of commanding the dog to sit e) Show the pa=ents the treats they will be giving to the dog f) Show the pa=ents how to properly give the dog a treat

    2. Have the dog approach each pa=ent one by one a) Let the pa=ents know everyone will get a turn and it is okay if they do not want to par=cipate b) Encourage the pa=ents to par=cipate c) Instruct the pa=ent to hold up the treat, call the dog’s name, and say the command d) Each pa=ent will work directly with the dog one on one e) Give the pa=ent a few treats before they give out the commands f) Pa=ent will be instructed to begin giving commands while holding treat, such as sit, stay, lay down, roll over, give paw, and speak

    g) Praise the pa=ent while they aFempt to give the dog commands h) Each pa=ent will get a turn

    3. Wrap up the discussion and ask for pa=ents’ feedback a) Ask the pa=ents what they learned today b) Ask the pa=ents what they would like to do with the dog in the future c) Ask the pa=ents if they enjoyed today’s group d) Ask the pa=ents if they have any ques=ons or concerns e) Allow pa=ents to say goodbye to the dog

    Week 3: 1. Reintroduce yourself and the dog and today’s ac=vity a) Allow the pa=ents to say hello to the dog b) Inform the pa=ents they will learn how to groom the dog today c) Ask the pa=ents why they believe grooming is important d) Explain to the pa=ents the importance of grooming e) Remind the pa=ents to be gentle

    2. Demonstrate how to properly brush the dog’s hair a) Have each pa=ent hold the brush and gently brush a sec=on of the dog’s hair b) Ask the pa=ents how they feel brushing the dog c) Ask the pa=ents if they have any ques=ons d) Allow the pa=ents to pet and talk to the dog

    3. Wrap up the discussion and ask for pa=ents’ feedback a) Ask pa=ents what they learned today b) Ask pa=ents what they would like to do with the dog in the future c) Ask pa=ents if they enjoyed today’s group d) Ask pa=ents if they have any ques=ons or concerns e) Allow pa=ents to say goodbye to the dog

    Week 4: 1. Reintroduce yourself and the dog and today’s ac=vity a) Allow the pa=ents to say hello to the dog b) Inform the pa=ents that they will play two games today – fetch and tug of war c) Hand out the toys and treats to pa=ents

    2. Demonstrate to the pa=ents how to play fetch, the command to use, how to toss the toy and how to give the dog the treat aVer he returns with the toy a) Each pa=ent gets a couple of turns b) Ask the pa=ents how they are feeling and if they are having fun

    3. Demonstrate to the pa=ents how to play tug of war with the dog a) Each pa=ent has a couple of turns b) Ask the pa=ents how they are feeling and if they are having fun

    4. Wrap up the discussion and ask for pa=ents’ feedback a) Ask pa=ents what they learned today b) Ask pa=ents what they would like to do with the dog in the future c) Ask pa=ents if they enjoyed today’s group d) Ask pa=ents if they have any ques=ons or concerns e) Allow pa=ents to say goodbye to the dog

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