8084 Dis Module 5

Reflect again on the scenario presented in this module’s introduction. How might Sabrina’s feelings be similar to your own when you first started to review Connor Street’s evaluation data? What additional information might have been helpful to have as you tried to use the data to determine program quality?
Effective communication of evaluation results is crucial to maintaining stakeholder engagement. Furthermore, respectfully connecting the data to each stakeholder’s prior understanding, as well as their interests and needs, helps to build a shared vision for the program. It also boosts morale and confidence toward data-driven change.
In this Discussion, you explore how to engage stakeholders in understanding and then acting upon program evaluations.
To prepare
Review the Community Tool Box resources which explore best practices for communicating with stakeholders. As a leader, consider how you might use these best practices to first promote understanding of evaluation results and to second, adopt change which is driven by evaluation results.

https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/participation/promoting-interest/communication-plan/main

 

 

https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/evaluate/evaluation-to-understand-and-improve/feedback-for-improvement/main

 

 

 

Assignment Task Part 1

Post the following:

In this Discussion, In 1 ½ pages create an adoption plan to communicate results and inspire change by explaining how evaluation results should be communicated to each stakeholder group: teachers, families, support staff, and accrediting agencies. Then, explain how you might use your leadership role to promote adoption across all stakeholder groups.

Read selections of your colleagues’ postings.

Assignment Task Part 2

Respond to two  of your colleagues’ postings in 150 words each in the following ways:

1. Explain how your colleague’s adoption “plan” might inspire change within the program and why.

2. Propose how your colleague might use evaluation results to create professional development opportunities for staff.

3. Propose how your colleague might use evaluation results to implement interventions for young children and their families.

4. Demonstrate evidence of personal learning as a result of collegial interaction.

Cite appropriate resources and provide references in APA format to substantiate your thinking.

4

 

Respond to two or more of your colleagues’ postings in 150 words response in the following ways:

Explain how your colleague’s adoption “plan” might inspire change within the program and why.

Propose how your colleague might use evaluation results to create professional development opportunities for staff.

Propose how your colleague might use evaluation results to implement interventions for young children and their families.

Demonstrate evidence of personal learning as a result of collegial interaction.

Cite appropriate resources and provide references in APA format to substantiate your thinking.

Note:  Throughout the week, create and continue professional dialogue by posing questions to colleagues and answering questions your colleagues have asked.

 

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1 day ago

Kelli Barnes 

 

Communicating Results and Inspiring Change

All too often, Sabrina’s story is common in different aspects of life.  As a teacher at Connor Street, Sabrina felt a little more assured with the support that she had been given when instruction was concerned.  However, when the data was presented from the evaluation and specifics were discussed, Sabrina felt uninformed of the meaning of detailed data, where it was retrieved from, what it concluded, and how it should be used to advance the program.  Thus as a leader, it is critical to have an adoption plan for evaluation results that would leave teachers and other stakeholders feeling not only informed, but a part of a bigger picture with ample knowledge on how to support a program to its fullest potential.

Planning is a path to organizing a group to potentially lead to the fufillment of a goal (Work Group for Community, 2016).  Therefore, to begin an adoption plan their needs to be a set of steps or procedures taken to effectively relay information and involve all parties affected.  Initially, there should be an objective.  What is the mission or goal?  Once the goal is indentified, additional steps can evolve.  These steps are not a checklist, but a road map instead to insure that a goal is reached and understood by all stakeholders.  Understanding your audience is the next step and most crucial.  With multiple stakeholders within  a program, it is imperative that each stakeholder’s position is acknowledge and understood before evaluation results are relayed.  This is an important element as each stakeholder does not have the same purpose in a program.  Families need to know that they are inlcuded and heard, just as an accredidation agency needs to be involved with data and changes that may effect a program.  Although these are two different stakeholders, results are still valuable to each party.  Therefore, knowing whom you are speaking to is significant. After identifying your audience, choosing the proper channels of commuincation is relevant.  As a leader, you would not send a newsletter to a staff member as you would a parent.  Instead, you would hold a group or staff meeting to go over pertinent information or results.  Lastly, planning your message and monitoring your effectiveness are the most extensive parts of communicating results to stakelholders (Mind Tools, 2015).  Results can mean different things to different stakeholders.  Therefore, as a leader is it vital to know your stakeholders, follow these steps, and maintain a level of engagement to further the communication between each group.  A program is only successful when all are informed and working together to achieve one goal.

References

Mind Tools (2015). Communications Planning: Getting the right message across the right way.  Retrieved from:https://www.mindtools.com/CommSkll/CommunicationsPlanning.htm

Work Group for Community Health and Development (2016). Chapter 6, section1 : Developing a Plan for Communication. Community Tool Box. Retrieved from:http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/participation/promoting-interest/communication-plan/main

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6 hours ago

Katheryn Gonzales 

 

Like Sabrina at Connor Street, I, too, have been confused and afraid to admit in a school meeting that I did not understand some of the data. I know the feeling of not understanding but also feeling afraid to admit that I didn’t understand. I would leave meetings feeling embarrassed and confused.

To avoid this type of experience for other stakeholder groups, a communication plan needs to be set in place to meet the stakeholder group’s needs. The very first step is to set up a communication plan. Think about your audience, what you want to communicate, how to get the message across, and the timing. Understanding the stakeholder group will help to guide how you communicate the message. Another critical step is to decide how the message will be delivered. Will you share data in a PowerPoint presentation, or will you provide handouts that stakeholders can take away with them? Next, plan the message that is being communicated. Make sure to gear the message to the specific stakeholder group. For example, suppose I am presenting data to a room full of teachers. In that case, I must assume when I am planning that some of the teachers in the room may be first-year teachers or they may not have had experience collecting data or interpreting data that I have collected. Before I begin sharing data, I will need to offer background information about the evaluation. Lastly, check for understanding. Give the stakeholder group opportunities to write down questions or to ask questions aloud (Mind Tools, 2015). Overall, tell the data as a story. Paint a picture that is compelling and appealing to the specific stakeholder groups.

When presenting data to families, it is essential to share the data responsibly and respectfully. Look for opportunities to engage families respectfully that represent what the student understands. For example, one way to present data to family members is through a parent-teacher conference. Use student work samples or a portfolio, but also share program level data so parents can compare program level or national average data to their child’s work. Sharing student work opens the door for parents and teachers to communicate student needs and to offer resources to the family to help support the student. Building a trusting relationship with families is vital for student success (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, n.d.).

 

References

 

Mind Tools. (2015). Communications planning: Getting the right messages across in the right

way. https://www.mindtools.com/CommSkll/CommunicationsPlanning.htm

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge

Center. (n.d.). Measuring what matters: Using data to support family progress.

Https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/data-ongoing-monitoring/article/measuring-what-matters-using-data-support-family-progress

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