3310 HUM MOD 2 ASSIGNMENT

(“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin (568-570), “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin (91-113), and “Wall of Fire Rising” by Edwidge Danticat (412-424), and “I’d Love You to Want Me” by Viet Thanh Nguyen (127-140).

Overview:

In this assignment, you will write an essay that analyzes one of the short stories and argues for a specific interpretation or theme of the story. Prepare a written response to the prompt below using a word processor. Please save your file in .doc or .docx format.

*To view the grading rubric for this assignment, click on the name of the assignment and click “View Rubric”

Instructions:

1. Write an essay that analyzes one of the short stories and argues for a specific interpretation or theme of the story. To do this, you will need to include paragraphs that address the following requirements:

. First paragraph: an introduction that ends with the thesis statement. Consider using this as a guide for constructing your introduction: 1) start broadly, connecting with a shared experience with the reader, 2) introduce the short story, stating the author full name and title (in quotation marks), and offering a brief summary, 3) transition sentence similar to this: Readers can discover a modern application for the story’s theme by considering what the author is saying about human experience or behavior in a universal way. 4) end with a thesis statement similar to this: In the story [“Story Title”], [author first and last name] explores [brief description of theme] by using the literary elements plot, characterization, setting, and symbol.

. Second paragraph: a paragraph that analyzes plot (including the main conflict and any resolutions, or lack of resolutions) and connects it back to your thesis/main argument or interpretation. 1) Start with a topic sentence like this: First, [author last name] uses plot to illustrate the theme. 2) Next, explain what plot is, perhaps quoting/citing from our textbook (be sure to include a special works cited for the textbook editor – see below), 3) Properly introduce and quote from the story an example which illustrates the theme as part of the plot, 4) explain how plot is used by the author to convey the theme.

. Third paragraph: a paragraph for characterization (including analyzing main characters using the terms “static” or “dynamic” and what their status demonstrates about them) and connects it back to your thesis/main argument or interpretation. 1) Start with a topic sentence like this: [author last name] also uses characterization to illustrate the theme. 2) Next, explain what characterization is, perhaps quoting/citing from our textbook (be sure to include a special works cited for the textbook editor – see below), 3) Properly introduce and quote from the story an example which illustrates the theme through the use of characters, 4) explain how characterization is used by the author to convey the theme.

. Fourth paragraph: a paragraph that analyzes the setting/s and why they matter and connects it back to your thesis/main argument or interpretation. 1) Start with a topic sentence like this: Next, [author last name] uses setting to illustrate the theme. 2) Next, explain what setting is, perhaps quoting/citing from our textbook (be sure to include a special works cited for the textbook editor – see below), 3) Properly introduce and quote from the story an example which demonstrates the importance of the setting, 4) explain how setting is used by the author to convey the theme.

. Fifth paragraph: a paragraph that analyzes any symbols or figurative language and connects it back to your thesis/main argument or interpretation. 1) Start with a topic sentence like this: Lastly, [author last name] uses symbol to illustrate the theme. 2) Next, explain what symbol is, perhaps quoting/citing from our textbook (be sure to include a special works cited for the textbook editor – see below), 3) Properly introduce and quote from the story an example which shows examples of how symbolism is used to demonstrate the theme, 4) explain how symbolism is used by the author to convey the theme.

. Sixth paragraph: a conclusion that brings this all together. 1) recap the thesis statement in different words, 2) recap the main points from the body paragraphs in the same order, and 3) reflect on how the story can help us understand the significance and worth of a character’s life or our own lives.

·  If you have not completed the Softchalk activity (see Module Two Learning Resources folder) over these terms, I recommend doing so before writing the paper. If you would like to send me a thesis statement for review prior to writing the essay (and prior to Friday at noon), please do so.

· As you write, remember to analyze –don’t retell or summarize –the story. You’ll make the most of your paper through analysis (taking apart the story like a scientist dissecting frogs) and interpretation (synthesizing, that is, putting back together to make sense of the meaning of the parts you have analyzed). The end of each paragraph should wrap back into your main point about the story, such that you are using your analysis of the parts of the story to support your interpretation.

· The essay should be in MLA format (in-text citations and Works Cited), and it should include multiple passages from the story used as evidence (minimum 5). It will likely take 3-4 pages to do this essay well. See rubric for grading details. If you cite instructional materials from our textbook, you must include a works cited entry for our textbook editor, Kelly J. Mays (see below), as well as a works cited entry for a story from our textbook (see the model on the discussion board):

Carver, Raymond. “Cathedral.” The Norton Introduction to Literature, Shorter Thirteenth Edition, edited by Kelly J. Mays,  W.W. Norton & Company, 2019, pp. 28-38.

Mays, Kelly J. The Norton Introduction to Literature, Shorter Thirteenth Edition. W.W. Norton & Company, 2019.

Please submit your completed document by using this assignment link. If you have any questions, please ask your professor.

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