Self-Assessment Journal

Over the semester you will complete a self-assessment (in Connect) that will give you some insight into your management style.  The idea is that as you are working through the chapters you will pick up on key theories and tools that will help you to notice and build on your own preference of management interactions.  Use the collection of surveys as a tool for reflection.  Are you where you want to be?  Why is the change needed or desired? Where would you like to see a change in your style?  What will you do to get where you want to be?

I. Self-Assessment Survey’s included in Connect: (To be completed prior to writing reflection)

  1. Are you Introverted or Extroverted?
  2. How Much Does Work Define Your Self-Concept?
  3. Needs-Strength Questionnaire
  4. Team Role Preference Scale
  5. Are You An Active Listener?
  6. What’s Your Approach to Influencing Co-workers?
  7. What Is Your Preferred Conflict Handling Style?
  8. Does It All Make Sense?
  9. Do You Think Leaders Make A Difference?
  10. What Organizational Structure Do You Prefer?

II. After completing the survey’s above in Connect, you are ready to reflect on your results. Each survey will provide a score and information for analysis. After reading your score(s) and the guide to the results, write a reflective piece on each survey. 

The reflective piece should:

  • be in one complete Word .docx
  • Include a title page: Your name, date, NVU, BUS3250, Self-Assessment Journal
  • Use the survey titles (copy and paste the ones above) as headings for each section.
  • Within each survey section answer these questions: (You may copy/paste these questions as subheadings under each heading.)
    • What was the survey trying to define for you?
    • What was your result score(s)?
    • In your own words, what do the results tell you?
    • Do you agree or disagree with these results? Please explain.
    • Is this an area that you would like to improve in and if so, how can knowing these results help you to implement change?
  • Conclusion1. Introversion

    Score : 11 pts.

    4 – 22 pts.

    Feedback: Some people thrive in teleworking arrangements, whereas others discover that it is neither a satisfying nor productive work environment for them. This scale assesses three personal dispositions that are identified in the literature as characteristics of effective teleworkers: (a) high company alignment, (b) low social needs at work and (c) independent initiative. Company alignment Company alignment estimates the extent to which you follow company procedures and have values congruent with company values. The greater the alignment, the more likely that you can abide by company practices while working alone and with direct supervision. While some deviation from company practices may be appropriate, teleworkers need to agree with company values and provide work that is consistent with company expectations most of the time. Scores on this scale range from 4 to 20.

    Extroversion

    Score: 17 pts.

    4 – 22 pts.

    Feedback: Low individualism Individualism refers to the extent that you value independence and personal uniqueness. Highly individualist people value personal freedom, self-sufficiency, control over their own lives, and appreciation of their unique qualities that distinguish them from others. However, keep in mind that the average level of individualism is higher in some cultures (such as Australia) than in others.

     

    2. Total score: 8 pts.

    RANGE BASED FEEDBACK:

    6-12 pts.

    Feedback: Low work centrality People with high work centrality define themselves mainly by their work roles and view non-work roles as much less significant. Consequently, people with a high work centrality score likely have lower complexity in their self-concept. This can be a concern because if something goes wrong with their work role, their non-work roles are not of sufficient value to maintain a positive self-evaluation. At the same time, work dominates our work lives, so those with very low scores would be more of the exception than the rule in most societies. Scores range from 6 to 36 with higher scores indicating higher work centrality. The norms in the following table are based on a large sample of Canadian employees (average score was 20.7). However, work centrality norms vary from one group to the next. For example, the average score in a sample of Canadian nurses was around 17 (translated to the scale range used here).

     

    3. Total score: 32 pts.

    RANGE BASED FEEDBACK:

    28-32 pts.

    Feedback: High need for social approval The need for social approval scale estimates the extent to which you are motivated to seek favourable evaluation from others. Founded on the drive to bond, the need for social approval is a secondary need, because people vary in this need based on their self-concept, values, personality and possibly social norms. This scale ranges from 0 to 32. How high or low is your need for social approval? The ideal would be to compare your score with the collective results of other students in your class. Otherwise, the following table offers a rough set of norms on which you can compare your score on this scale.

     

    4. Encourager

    Score : 13 pts.

    5 – 15 pts.

    Feedback: Your rankings have been organized in the following according to five team roles. The first three categories are people-oriented: encourager, gatekeeper, and harmonizer. The last two roles, initiator and recorder, are task-oriented. Note: Higher scores represent a preference for team roles (the minimum score is 5, maximum score is 15).

    Understanding Your Score

    Encourager: Fosters group solidarity by accepting and praising various points of view.

    An effective encourager will build and maintain greater enthusiasm and commitment by group members. It may be as simple as a comment that the group is staying on track to a statement about the group’s exceptional performance. Praise may be most effective when tied to a specific insight such as “That’s an excellent idea. It has the potential for reducing costs by a significant amount.”

     

    Gatekeeper

    Score : 11 pts.

    5 – 15 pts.

    Feedback: Your rankings have been organized in the following according to five team roles. The first three categories are people-oriented: encourager, gatekeeper, and harmonizer. The last two roles, initiator and recorder, are task-oriented. Note: Higher scores represent a preference for team roles (the minimum score is 5, maximum score is 15). Understanding Your Score

    Gatekeeper: Encourages all group members to participate.

    Team members do not automatically contribute equally since some individuals may attempt to dominate discussions while others are reluctant to express their views. Also, a group member may not be confident enough to admit ignorance about a topic under discussion. The gatekeeper may also paraphrase what everyone is saying, such as, “So far, the consensus is that the West Coast offers the best market potential. Does everyone agree?”

     

    Harmonizer

    Score : 7 pts.

    5 – 15 pts.

    Feedback: Your rankings have been organized in the following according to five team roles. The first three categories are people-oriented: encourager, gatekeeper, and harmonizer. The last two roles, initiator and recorder, are task-oriented. Note: Higher scores represent a preference for team roles (the minimum score is 5, maximum score is 15).

    Understanding Your Score Harmonizer: Mediates conflict through reconciliation or humor.

    An effective harmonizer realizes that conflict is a healthy, natural part of group interactions. However, disagreements need to focus on solving problems and meeting goals set by the group. They should not become personal. Harmonizers find ways to bridge gaps and identify the reasons behind conflicts. For example, an effective harmonizer might say something like “While the two of you disagree on what is causing the problem, you both agree on how to solve it. So, what additional information do we need to gather to determine why the product is so unreliable?”

     

    Initiator

    Score : 7 pts.

    5 – 15 pts.

    Feedback: Your rankings have been organized in the following according to five team roles. The first three categories are people-oriented: encourager, gatekeeper, and harmonizer. The last two roles, initiator and recorder, are task-oriented. Note: Higher scores represent a preference for team roles (the minimum score is 5, maximum score is 15). Understanding Your Score

    Initiator: Suggests new goals or ideas.

    The initiator might state: “The main purpose of this meeting is to solve the problem our client is having with this product.” Alternatively, the initiator may pose a question that focuses everyone on establishing a goal, such as “What are we trying to accomplish in this meeting?” According to Greg Hendrix at the Center for the Study of Work Teams, “Goal establishment is critical for the success of the team. Without it, the team is almost assured to perform at less than their potential.” He further states that a team with a goal will foster an environment that is more relaxed, cooperative, and trusting.

     

    Recorder

    Score : 7 pts.

    5 – 15 pts.

    Feedback: Your rankings have been organized in the following according to five team roles. The first three categories are people-oriented: encourager, gatekeeper, and harmonizer. The last two roles, initiator and recorder, are task-oriented. Note: Higher scores represent a preference for team roles (the minimum score is 5, maximum score is 15). Understanding Your Score

    Recorder: Performs a “group memory” function by documenting discussion and outcomes. By restating what has been said so far, the team can assess its progress and where it needs to go. For example, “It appears that everyone is in agreement. So far, here are the steps we’ve agreed to take…”

     

    5. Avoiding Interruption

    Score : 6 pts.

    5-7

    Feedback : Your textbook described several dimensions of active listening. Five of these dimensions are estimated in this self-assessment: Avoiding Interruption, Maintaining Interest, Postponing Evaluation, Organising Information and Showing Interest. Together, these five dimensions represent the total active listening score. Each subscale has a potential score ranging from 0 to 9 points; the total active listening score has a range from 0 to 45 points. Higher scores indicate that the person perceives that he or she has a higher level of each skill. The following graphs compare your results to the range of scores among a sample of over 200 MBA students. Average score People with high scores on this dimension have a strong tendency to let the speaker finish his or her statements before responding. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 9. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 5.9.

     

    Maintaining Interest

    Score : 4 pts.

    3-5

    Feedback : Average score People with high scores on this dimension have a strong tendency to remain focused and concentrate on what the speaker is saying even when the conversation is boring or the information is well known. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 9. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 4.6.

     

    Postponing Evaluation

    Score : 6 pts.

    4-6

    Feedback : Average score People with high scores on this dimension have a strong tendency to keep an open mind and avoid evaluating what the speaker is saying until the speaker has finished. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 9. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 5.4.

     

    Organising Information

    Score : 4 pts.

    0-4

    Feedback : Low score People with high scores on this dimension have a strong tendency to actively organise the speaker’s ideas into meaningful categories. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 9. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 6.4.

     

    Showing Interest

    Score : 5 pts.

    5-6

    Feedback : Average score People with high scores on this dimension have a strong tendency to use nonverbal gestures or brief verbal acknowledgements to demonstrate that they are paying attention to the speaker. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 9. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 5.7.

    Total score: 25 pts.

    RANGE BASED FEEDBACK:

    21-28 pts.

    Feedback: Moderate active listening People with high scores on this total score have a strong tendency to actively sense the sender’s signals, evaluate them accurately and respond appropriately. Scores on this active listening total score range from 0 to 45. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 27.9.

     

    6. Persuasion

    Score : 2.67 pts.

    Silent authority

    Score: 1.33 pts.

    Exchange

    Score : 1 pts.

    Assertiveness

    Score : 0 pts.

    Information control

    Score : 0.33 pts.

    Coalition information

    Score : 0.33 pts.

    Upward appeal

    Score : 1.33 pts.

    Ingratiation

    Score : 0.67 pts.

     

    7. Yielding

    Score : 3.75 pts.

    Compromising

    Score : 3.5 pts.

    Forcing

    Score : 1.75 pts.

     

    Problem Solving

    Score : 4.25 pts.

    4 – 10 pts.

    Feedback: Low preference Problem solving tries to find a mutually beneficial solution for both parties. Information sharing is an important feature of this style because both parties need to identify common ground and potential solutions that satisfy both (or all) of them.

     

    Avoiding

    Score : 4.25 pts.

    4 – 7 pts.

    Feedback: Low preference Avoiding tries to smooth over or avoid conflict situations altogether. It represents a low concern for both self and the other party. In other words, avoiders try to suppress thinking about the conflict.

     

    8. Total score: 27 pts.

    RANGE BASED FEEDBACK:

    27-37 pts.

    Feedback: Average Romance of leadership is a phenomenon in which followers (and possibly other stakeholders) want to believe that leaders make a difference in the organisation’s success. People with a high romance of leadership score attribute the causes of organisational events much more to its leaders and much less to the economy, competition and other factors beyond the leader’s short-term control. This ranges from 10 to 50, with higher scores indicating that the person has a higher romance of leadership. The following norms are derived from a large sample of European employees with an average age in the mid-30s and work experience averaging about 15 years. However, these norms should be viewed with caution because the romance of leadership scale is a recent development and norms for any instrument can vary from one group to the next

     

    9. Tall hierarchy

    Score : 10 pts.

    6-10

    Feedback : This self-assessment calculates your preferred organisational structure. Specifically, it estimates the extent to which you prefer a mechanistic or organic structure, as well as the three dimensions of a mechanistic structure: tall hierarchy, formalisation and centralization. The following graphs compare your preferred organisational structure scores to a sample of over 200 MBA students. However, due to cultural, occupational and age differences, these results might be less relevant to you. Average preference People with high scores on this dimension prefer to work in organisations with several levels of hierarchy and a narrow span of control (few employees per supervisor). Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 15. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 7.8.

     

    Formalisation

    Score : 9 pts.

    9-11

    Feedback : Average preference People with high scores on this dimension prefer to work in organisations where jobs are clearly defined with limited discretion. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 15. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 9.4.

     

    Total score: 23 pts.

    RANGE BASED FEEDBACK:

    22-29 pts.

    Feedback: Average preference People with high scores on this overall score prefer to work in mechanistic organisations, whereas those with low scores prefer to work in organic organisational structures. Mechanistic structures are characterised by a narrow span of control and high degree of formalisation and centralization. Organic structures have a wide span of control, little formalisation and decentralised decision making. Scores on this subscale range from 0 to 45. The average score among a sample of MBA students was 24.9.

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